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Saturday, September 24, 2011

Opening Instructor Part 3

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Catalan Opening Part 3  ( 8 --- Nd5)

It is generally known that in the closed openings, such as the Queen's Gambit, Black's Main problem is the development of the Queen's Bishop. The Queen's Indian aims to solve precisely this problem by developing the Bishop on b7 ( or as the case may be a6).

In the catalan opening White anticipates this pan and takes control of the long diagonal first.

The pressure along the 'Catalan' diagonal is obvious and Black frequently has problems with the development of his Queen side. However, the other side of the coin is that the c4 pawn is left without its most natural defence, the light squared Bishop. This means that Black can capture that pawn at virtually any moment. If white decides to win the pawn Back, this is usually connected with loss of considerable time or some other positional concessions.

Black can also opt for more solid approach, besides slow development behind the shelter of the central pawn, something like Nbd7, c6, Bb7 or Ba6 and only late choose the best form of counter pay, be it dxc4 or c5.

This opening was officially played for the first time in 1929 in the town of sitges (near Barcelona). There were the best players at that time such as Tartakower. The Passionate Francese Armengol who was one of the organizers of the international chess tournament framed in the Universal Exposition of Barcelona. Armengol had in mind that it should be an opening called the catalan opening, so that there is also Spanish, Italian, French or Netherland opennes so, he took advantage of going to the tournament to call a competition where the participants had to invent and play a new opening, that would take that name.It was the Polish Tartakower who won the competition and he put in his pocket the not despicable, at that time, 150 pessetes (Just over one dollor today) A strange combination of gambit of Queen with a Fianchetto of the Kingside.

1 d4 d5  2  c4  e6  3  Nf3  Nf6  4  g3  dxc4  Bg2  Bd7  6  Ne5  Bc6  7  Nxc6  Nxc6  8  0-0  Nd5




9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16



 1
e3
 Be7
Qc2
 b5
b3
 Ndb4
Qe2
 c3(1)














 2
Qa4
 Nb6
Bxc6
 bxc6
Qxc6
 Qd7
Qxd7(2)
 Kxd7
e4(3)












 3
----
 Qd7
Qxc4
 Nb6
Qd3
 0-0-0
Qf3(4)















 4
----
 Qd6
Qxc4
Qb4 
Bxd5
exd5 
Qxd5
 Qxd4
Qf3
Bb4 











 5






Qxb4
Ndxb4 
Nc3
Nc2 
d5
exd5 
Rb1
0-0-0 
Bxd5






 6









-----
Nxd4 
Bxb7
Rb8 
Be4
f5 
Be3
Nxe2+ (5) 
Nxe2
fxe4 (6) 


 7


























 1  Black easily equalises.
2  12 Qf3  Be7  13  Nc3  0-0  14  Rd1  White is slightly better due to weak.
3. White's chances are slightly preferable.
4 and White's light squared Bishop should secure him an advantage.
5 15 ---fxe4  16  Bxd4  Nc6  17  Be3  Rxb2  18  Rab1  
    15 --- Bc5  16  Bb1  0-0  17  Rd1  Rfd8  18  Kg2  Nbc6  19  Bd3
6  17  Nc3  Nd5  18  Bd4  Nf6  19  Rfe1  Bb4  20  Re3 ( White has better prospects )

Opening Instructor Part 2


Opening Instructor Part 1