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Monday, November 7, 2011

The Bishop.

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There are three types of Bishop. You may get confused for three types of Bishops since there are only two types 1) Dark Bishop 2)Light squared Bishop. No it is not so, there are three types,


1) Good Bishop : A Bishop is considered good when its central pawns are not on its colour and thus are not obstructing its activity.

2) Bad Bishop : A Bishop is considered bad when its central pawns are on its colour and thus Block it.

3) Active Bishop : An active Bishop can be either good or bad; it's called active simply because it serves an active function.

There are some Bishop rules to follow in the game of chess.



Bishops are long range pieces and love wide-open positions that are free of central pawns.


In the endgame, Bishops are great at stopping enemy pawn,s which they can often do from the other side of the board.

If your are unfortunate enough to possess a bad (and inactive) Bishop, you are usually well advised to do one of three things :

1. Trade the offending piece off for an enemy Bishop or Knight.
2. Make it good by moving the central pawns off the colour of your Bishop.
3. Get your Bishop outside the pawn chain. Many games have been won by turning an impotent bad Bishop nt a 'bad' but active piece.



In the endgame, Bishops are great at stopping enemy pawns, which they can often do from the other side of the board.


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If a player gets the two Bishops versus a Bishop and Knight or Two knights, he usually wants to retain them because, working together, the Bishops control squares of both colours. If your opponent has two Bishops, trade one of them off and leave yourself with a more manageable Knight versus Bishop or Bishop versus Bishop scenario.